1. Visitors have six textile samples, each looking about the same. They will have to find out which of them originates from animals (pure wool or silk), from plants (cotton) or which are artificial.


  2. Pieces of denim textiles are examined for their properties after having been stone washed or bleached by enzymes.


  3. In this workshop visitors can see the basic reaction in the production of plastics, polymerisation.



   Description of the Experiment   
  1. Visitors take a small piece of textile between tweezers and transfer it to a candle flame. N.B. The candle is situated behind a safety wall. Immediately after it starts to burn, the piece of textile is placed on top of carbon dioxide ice, whereupon the burning is extinguished. This process is repeated with all six pieces of textile.


  2. Visitors study denim textile samples that have been treated with cellulose enzyme to obtain the real denim colour. These kinds of enzymes provide a stone-free washing process which is much more environmentally-friendly than traditional stone washing with real stones.


  3. Visitors mix two chemicals together by carefully pouring solution A on top of solution B. NB. this experiment must be done in a fume cupboard. Using a glass rod, visitors can lift the reaction product (polyamide) formed at the interface of the two solutions. The polyamide can be wound around the glass rod almost endlessly, because new polyamide is constantly being created at the interface of the solutions.
   Duration   

The whole workshop lasts about one our.

   Conclusion   
  1. The six pieces of textile are compared to each other in terms of smell and touch. The results are recorded in a characteristics diagram.


  2. Enzymes for bio-stoning have been developed to offer a cost-effective and environmentally-friendly alternative to denim finishing.


  3. Nylon, i.e. polyamide, is made from two chemicals, decanedioic dichloride and diaminohexane. They are both small but long and flexible molecules. The small molecules connect with one another, thereby producing giant molecules, polyamides.
   Detailed Conclusion   
  1. Textile fibres are classified according to origin. They may be natural fibres, in which case they originate either from animals (silk and wool, for example) or from plants (cotton, for example). The fibres may also be artificial, i.e. industrially manufactured. These synthetic fibres may be made from fibres that have a natural origin (viscose) or they may be synthesised from petrochemicals (polyamide and polyester).

    Natural fibres have been used since prehistoric times. Artificial fibres have been in use for around 80 years. It is often difficult to recognise textile fibres because fibres can be treated to improve and alter their characteristics. The burning test allows natural and artificial fibres as well as animal- and plant-derived fibres to be easily determined.

    Results of the burning test:
    wool: burns and chars, smells bad
    silk: burns and chars, smells bad
    cotton: burns and chars, continues to burn away from the flame, ash residue
    viscose: burns to an ash
    polyamide (nylon): burns and melts into a blob
    polyester: burns and melts into a blob



  2. Bio-stoning has many advantages compared to the traditional stone washing. E. g.it is less material attacking then stone washing.



  3. Nylon, i.e. polyamide, is made from two chemicals, decanedioic dichloride and diaminohexane. They are both small but long and flexible molecules. The small molecules connect with one another, thereby producing giant molecules, polyamides.